The things I do for fic...

The things I do for fic...

165,056 notes

x-file:

catazoid:

As promised, here are some pictures of Lyalya’s first walk outside! Look at the bushy little squirrel tail :D the sandpit was her favorite spot! She was extremely excited and threw sand all over the place

this is a fucking squirrel. this is a fucking squirrel with a cat’s head. who is responsible for this

(via sarcysnarky)

43,742 notes

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

(via damebubble)

22 notes

grimm-anatoli:

NOW OPEN FOR COMMISSION 

Alright, so I was supposed to get surgery today, but it has been postponed. I need money because I can’t find a job, so I have no other choice but to ruin my drawing hand some more in order to scrape up a little extra cash to help pay for medical stuffs. Please, I need your help. 

I am willing to drawing anything, anyone except if it is NSFW

Comic page- 10 dollars each (formatted any way you want, can be about anything you want. Scene for a game, book, or even an rp between OCs) 

Chibis- 5 dollars each. No extra charge for couples. 

Icons for your blog- 2 dollars each (don’t have to be in chibi style if you don’t want) 

Sketch- 2 dollars 

If interested, please contact me at 
chibicherno@gmail.com

(via grimm-anatoli)

Filed under signal boost Signal mutherfucking boost

13,382 notes

monanotlisa:

mikes-grrl:

So I’ve been sitting on this gifset for a while, trying to think of how I want to parse this.

Maybe I’m following the wrong blogs, but I just do not see enough meta about Natasha’s story arc in this movie. This scene here is, to me, one of the three critical moments for Natasha that are the reasons she ends up being the one to release all of SHIELD’s data to the world.

As follows (quotes paraphrased as I don’t have the script):

  1. The first critical moment comes on the Lemurian Star, right after Batroc throws a grenade at her and Steve. They end up sitting on the floor and she says, “Okay, that one’s on me” and Steve replies “Damn right it is.” Her reaction to that isn’t disdain or frustration with Steve, it’s very clearly a form of disappointment — she’s upset with how Steve views her, his opinion of her. Sure, I’m reading a lot into that expression, but I think it is pretty masterful of ScarJo to show that side of Natasha in such an ambiguous way. The take-away here, however you want to describe it, is that Natasha’s unhappiness has less to do with being nearly blown up than with her working relationship with Steve. He doesn’t trust her, and that burns her.
  2. The above gif’d scene, where it’s clear that she’s pretty shocked and upset to hear Steve admit that previous to their current situation, he would NOT have trusted her. It’s a blow for her to realize just how she’s been perceived by those she’s given her complete trust and faith to. 
  3. The scene where Fury’s survival is revealed is the final one, where Natasha reacts as if to a body blow when she realizes that Fury didn’t trust her, but he did trust Maria Hill. Earlier when he was “dying” it was clear that she’s somehow emotionally attached to Fury, and whatever reason you want to concoct for that, the fact is that she clearly believed that he did trust her…but he didn’t. My opinion of her reaction shot at the reveal is that she’s not angry about it, she’s heartbroken.

What I believe this all points to is really well reflected in her line to Steve, “I don’t know everything, I just act like I do” (paraphrased), and then reiterated in the truck ride where she talks about being the person she needs to be, as opposed to who she is. 

In other words, Natasha is so good at being “whatever you need me to be” that it is exactly what the people who know her best expect of her, and accordingly don’t feel like she’s trustworthy because they don’t know the “real” her. Meanwhile she has been operating on the belief that they do know the real her and so therefore do trust her. 

It’s like…a double blind situation, where both parties aren’t privy to the truth, even though they think they are. Everyone up to and including Fury “knows” that Natasha is a spy and nothing she says can be trusted; Natasha “knows” that the people she trusts see through that mask and trust her in return because they know the real her. She goes around in this movie constantly surprised and disarmed by the fact that her closest friends/co-workers doubt her loyalty. 

So in the end, when Pierce is asking if she is ready for her past to be revealed, she is so fucking ready it hurts. She knows it is the right thing to do, but putting that on top of the experiences given above, it’s easy to see that she felt she had to do it for herself too. 

Can she be trusted? You’re damn right she can, and she was willing to burn down her entire world to prove that fact to the very people she thought knew it already.

(Source: forassgard, via krusca)

Filed under Natasha deserves her own tag captain america 2: the winter soldier spoiler warning SPOILERS!! cap 2 spoilers